CIC 538 The Gospels speak of a time of solitude for Jesus in the desert immediately after his baptism by John. Driven by the Spirit into the desert, Jesus remains there for forty days without eating; he lives among wild beasts, and angels minister to him.1 At the end of this time Satan tempts him three times, seeking to compromise his filial attitude toward God. Jesus rebuffs these attacks, which recapitulate the temptations of Adam in Paradise and of Israel in the desert, and the devil leaves him “until an opportune time”.2

CIC 695 Anointing. The symbolism of anointing with oil also signifies the Holy Spirit,3 to the point of becoming a synonym for the Holy Spirit. In Christian initiation, anointing is the sacramental sign of Confirmation, called “chrismation” in the Churches of the East. Its full force can be grasped only in relation to the primary anointing accomplished by the Holy Spirit, that of Jesus. Christ (in Hebrew “messiah”) means the one “anointed” by God’s Spirit. There were several anointed ones of the Lord in the Old Covenant, pre-eminently King David.4 But Jesus is God’s Anointed in a unique way: the humanity the Son assumed was entirely anointed by the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit established him as “Christ.”5 The Virgin Mary conceived Christ by the Holy Spirit who, through the angel, proclaimed him the Christ at his birth, and prompted Simeon to come to the temple to see the Christ of the Lord.6 The Spirit filled Christ and the power of the Spirit went out from him in his acts of healing and of saving.7 Finally, it was the Spirit who raised Jesus from the dead.8 Now, fully established as “Christ” in his humanity victorious over death, Jesus pours out the Holy Spirit abundantly until “the saints” constitute – in their union with the humanity of the Son of God – that perfect man “to the measure of the stature of the fullness of Christ”:9 “the whole Christ,” in St. Augustine’s expression.

CIC 2096 Adoration is the first act of the virtue of religion. To adore God is to acknowledge him as God, as the Creator and Savior, the Lord and Master of everything that exists, as infinite and merciful Love. “You shall worship the Lord your God, and him only shall you serve,” says Jesus, citing Deuteronomy.10

CIC 2119 Tempting God consists in putting his goodness and almighty power to the test by word or deed. Thus Satan tried to induce Jesus to throw himself down from the Temple and, by this gesture, force God to act.11 Jesus opposed Satan with the word of God: “You shall not put the LORD your God to the test.”12 The challenge contained in such tempting of God wounds the respect and trust we owe our Creator and Lord. It always harbors doubt about his love, his providence, and his power.13

CIC 2855 The final doxology, “For the kingdom, the power and the glory are yours, now and forever,” takes up again, by inclusion, the first three petitions to our Father: the glorification of his name, the coming of his reign, and the power of his saving will. But these prayers are now proclaimed as adoration and thanksgiving, as in the liturgy of heaven.14 The ruler of this world has mendaciously attributed to himself the three titles of kingship, power, and glory.15 Christ, the Lord, restores them to his Father and our Father, until he hands over the kingdom to him when the mystery of salvation will be brought to its completion and God will be all in all.16

1 Cf. Mk 1:12-13.
2 Lk 4:13.
3 Cf. 1 In 2:20:27; 2 Cor 1:21.
4 Cf. Ex 30:22-32; 1 Sam 16:13.
5 Cf. Lk 418-19; Isa 61:1.
6 Cf. Lk 2:11,26-27.
7 Cf. Lk 4:1; 6:19; 8:46.
8 Cf. Rom 1:4; 8:11.
9 Eph 4:13; cf. Acts 2:36.
10 Lk 4:8; Cf. Deut 6:13.
11 Cf. Lk 4:9.
12 Deut 6:16.
13 Cf. 1 Cor 10:9; Ex 17:2-7; Ps 95:9.
14 Cf. Rev 1:6; 4:11; 5:13.
15 Cf. Lk 4:5-6.
16 1 Cor 15:24-28.