CIC 363 In Sacred Scripture the term “soul” often refers to human life or the entire human person.1 But “soul” also refers to the innermost aspect of man, that which is of greatest value in him,2 that by which he is most especially in God’s image: “soul” signifies the spiritual principle in man.

CIC 440 Jesus accepted Peter’s profession of faith, which acknowledged him to be the Messiah, by announcing the imminent Passion of the Son of Man.3 He unveiled the authentic content of his messianic kingship both in the transcendent identity of the Son of Man “who came down from heaven”, and in his redemptive mission as the suffering Servant: “The Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.”4 Hence the true meaning of his kingship is revealed only when he is raised high on the cross.5 Only after his Resurrection will Peter be able to proclaim Jesus’ messianic kingship to the People of God: “Let all the house of Israel therefore know assuredly that God has made him both Lord and Christ, this Jesus whom you crucified.”6

CIC 695 Anointing. The symbolism of anointing with oil also signifies the Holy Spirit,7 to the point of becoming a synonym for the Holy Spirit. In Christian initiation, anointing is the sacramental sign of Confirmation, called “chrismation” in the Churches of the East. Its full force can be grasped only in relation to the primary anointing accomplished by the Holy Spirit, that of Jesus. Christ (in Hebrew “messiah”) means the one “anointed” by God’s Spirit. There were several anointed ones of the Lord in the Old Covenant, pre-eminently King David.8 But Jesus is God’s Anointed in a unique way: the humanity the Son assumed was entirely anointed by the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit established him as “Christ.”9 The Virgin Mary conceived Christ by the Holy Spirit who, through the angel, proclaimed him the Christ at his birth, and prompted Simeon to come to the temple to see the Christ of the Lord.10 The Spirit filled Christ and the power of the Spirit went out from him in his acts of healing and of saving.11 Finally, it was the Spirit who raised Jesus from the dead.12 Now, fully established as “Christ” in his humanity victorious over death, Jesus pours out the Holy Spirit abundantly until “the saints” constitute – in their union with the humanity of the Son of God – that perfect man “to the measure of the stature of the fullness of Christ”:13 “the whole Christ,” in St. Augustine’s expression.

CIC 1226 From the very day of Pentecost the Church has celebrated and administered holy Baptism. Indeed St. Peter declares to the crowd astounded by his preaching: “Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins; and you shall receive the gift of the Holy Spirit.”14 The apostles and their collaborators offer Baptism to anyone who believed in Jesus: Jews, the God-fearing, pagans.15 Always, Baptism is seen as connected with faith: “Believe in the Lord Jesus, and you will be saved, you and your household,” St. Paul declared to his jailer in Philippi. And the narrative continues, the jailer “was baptized at once, with all his family.”16

CIC 1262 The different effects of Baptism are signified by the perceptible elements of the sacramental rite. Immersion in water symbolizes not only death and purification, but also regeneration and renewal. Thus the two principal effects are purification from sins and new birth in the Holy Spirit.17

CIC 1287 This fullness of the Spirit was not to remain uniquely the Messiah’s, but was to be communicated to the whole messianic people.18 On several occasions Christ promised this outpouring of the Spirit,19 a promise which he fulfilled first on Easter Sunday and then more strikingly at Pentecost.20 Filled with the Holy Spirit the apostles began to proclaim “the mighty works of God,” and Peter declared this outpouring of the Spirit to be the sign of the messianic age.21 Those who believed in the apostolic preaching and were baptized received the gift of the Holy Spirit in their turn.22

CIC 1427 Jesus calls to conversion. This call is an essential part of the proclamation of the kingdom: “The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand; repent, and believe in the gospel.”23 In the Church’s preaching this call is addressed first to those who do not yet know Christ and his Gospel. Also, Baptism is the principal place for the first and fundamental conversion. It is by faith in the Gospel and by Baptism24 that one renounces evil and gains salvation, that is, the forgiveness of all sins and the gift of new life.

1 Cf. Mt 16:25-26; Jn 15:13; Acts 2:41.
2 Cf. Mt 10:28; 26:38; Jn 12:27; 2 Macc 6 30.
3 Cf. Mt 16:16-23.
4 Jn 3:13; Mt 20:28; cf. Jn 6:62; Dan 7:13; Is 53:10-12.
5 Cf. Jn 19:19-22; Lk 23:39-43.
6 Acts 2:36.
7 Cf. 1 In 2:20:27; 2 Cor 1:21.
8 Cf. Ex 30:22-32; 1 Sam 16:13.
9 Cf. Lk 418-19; Isa 61:1.
10 Cf. Lk 2:11,26-27.
11 Cf. Lk 4:1; 6:19; 8:46.
12 Cf. Rom 1:4; 8:11.
13 Eph 4:13; cf. Acts 2:36.
14 Acts 2:38.
15 Cf. Acts 2:41; 8:12-13; 10:48; 16:15.
16 Acts 16:31-33.
17 Cf. Acts 2:38; Jn 3:5.
18 Cf. Ezek 36:25-27; Joel 3:1-2.
19 Cf. Lk 12:12; Jn 3:5-8; 7:37-39; 16:7-15; Acts 1:8.
20 Cf. Jn 20:22; Acts 2:1-14.
21 Acts 2:11; Cf. 2:17-18.
22 Cf. Acts 2:38.
23 Mk 1:15.
24 Cf. Acts 2:38.