CIC 2427 Human work proceeds directly from persons created in the image of God and called to prolong the work of creation by subduing the earth, both with and for one another.1 Hence work is a duty: “If any one will not work, let him not eat.”2 Work honors the Creator’s gifts and the talents received from him. It can also be redemptive. By enduring the hardship of work3 in union with Jesus, the carpenter of Nazareth and the one crucified on Calvary, man collaborates in a certain fashion with the Son of God in his redemptive work. He shows himself to be a disciple of Christ by carrying the cross, daily, in the work he is called to accomplish.4 Work can be a means of sanctification and a way of animating earthly realities with the Spirit of Christ.

CIC 2830 “Our bread”: The Father who gives us life cannot not but give us the nourishment life requires – all appropriate goods and blessings, both material and spiritual. In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus insists on the filial trust that cooperates with our Father’s providence.5 He is not inviting us to idleness,6 but wants to relieve us from nagging worry and preoccupation. Such is the filial surrender of the children of God:
To those who seek the kingdom of God and his righteousness, he has promised to give all else besides. Since everything indeed belongs to God, he who possesses God wants for nothing, if he himself is not found wanting before God.7

1 Cf. Gen 1:28; GS 34; CA 31.
2 2 Thess 3:10; Cf. 1 Thess 4:11.
3 Cf. Gen 3:14-19.
4 Cf. LE 27.
5 Cf. Mt 6:25-34.
6 Cf. 2 Thess 3:6-13.
7 St. Cyprian, De Dom. orat. 21 PL 4, 534A.