CIC 105 God is the author of Sacred Scripture. “The divinely revealed realities, which are contained and presented in the text of Sacred Scripture, have been written down under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit.”1
“For Holy Mother Church, relying on the faith of the apostolic age, accepts as sacred and canonical the books of the Old and the New Testaments, whole and entire, with all their parts, on the grounds that, written under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, they have God as their author, and have been handed on as such to the Church herself.”2

CIC 517 Christ’s whole life is a mystery of redemption. Redemption comes to us above all through the blood of his cross,3 but this mystery is at work throughout Christ’s entire life:
– already in his Incarnation through which by becoming poor he enriches us with his poverty;4
– in his hidden life which by his submission atones for our disobedience;5
– in his word which purifies its hearers;6
– in his healings and exorcisms by which “he took our infirmities and bore our diseases”;7
– and in his Resurrection by which he justifies us.8

CIC 554 From the day Peter confessed that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of the living God, the Master “began to show his disciples that he must go to Jerusalem and suffer many things. .. and be killed, and on the third day be raised.”9 Peter scorns this prediction, nor do the others understand it any better than he.10 In this context the mysterious episode of Jesus’ Transfiguration takes place on a high mountain,11 before three witnesses chosen by himself: Peter, James and John. Jesus’ face and clothes become dazzling with light, and Moses and Elijah appear, speaking “of his departure, which he was to accomplish at Jerusalem”.12 A cloud covers him and a voice from heaven says: “This is my Son, my Chosen; listen to him!”13

CIC 613 Christ’s death is both the Paschal sacrifice that accomplishes the definitive redemption of men, through “the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world”,14 and the sacrifice of the New Covenant, which restores man to communion with God by reconciling him to God through the “blood of the covenant, which was poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins”.15

1 DV 11.
2 DV 11; cf. Jn 20:31; 2 Tim 3:16; 2 Pt 1:19-21; 3:15-16.
3 Cf. Eph 1:7; Col 1:13-14; 1 Pt 1:18-19.
4 Cf. 2 Cor 8:9.
5 Cf. Lk 2:51.
6 Cf. Jn 15:3.
7 Mt 8:17; cf. Is 53:4.
8 Cf. Rom 4:25.
9 Mt 16:21.
10 Cf. Mt 16:22-23; 17:23; Lk 9:45.
11 Cf. Mt 17:1-8 and parallels; 2 Pt 1:16-18.
12 Lk 9:31.
13 Lk 9:35.
14 Jn 1:29; cf. 8:34-36; 1 Cor 5:7; 1 Pt 1:19.
15 Mt 26:28; cf. Ex 24:8; Lev 16:15-16; Cor 11:25.